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Find out what your DNA says about your health, traits and ancestry.

Features

meets fda requirements

Learn how your genetics can influence your risk for certain diseases.

  • 5+ reports including:
  • BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants)
  • NEW!
  • Celiac Disease
  • Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • sample report
Now with 150+ regions

Discover where your DNA is from out of 150+ regions worldwide - and more.

  • 5 reports including:
  • Ancestry Composition
  • Maternal & Paternal Haplogroups
  • Neanderthal Ancestry
  • sample report

Learn how your genes play a role in your well-being and lifestyle choices.

  • 5+ reports including:
  • Deep Sleep
  • Lactose Intolerance
  • Genetic Weight
  • sample report
meets fda requirements

If you are starting a family, find out if you are a carrier for certain inherited conditions.

  • 40+ reports including:
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Hereditary Hearing Loss
  • sample report

Learn how your DNA influences your facial features, taste, smell and other traits.

  • 25+ reports including:
  • Hair Loss
  • Sweet vs. Salty
  • Unibrow
  • sample report

Check out our newest report — Genetic Weight.

learn more

Important Test Info

There is a lot to consider with genetic testing. We encourage you to review relevant information about Carrier Status* and Genetic Health Risk* reports on the Test Information page.

important test info

Genetic Health Risk reports*

5+ reports

Genetic Health Risk reports provide information about whether you carry genetic markers associated with risks for certain health conditions. They are not for diagnosis. Factors like lifestyle, environment and genetic markers not covered by this test can also play a role. These reports provide you with more insights to be the best possible advocate – for you.

Reports include* See sample report
Now with 150+ regions

Ancestry reports

5 reports

Your DNA comes from all of your ancestors. In your DNA, we can find genetic traces of where your ancestors lived throughout history.

You also share DNA with people around the world today. You can choose to connect with them through our DNA Relative database. You can continue to find new relatives as our database of more than one million customers grows over time. Learn more.

Reports include See sample report

Wellness reports

5+ reports

When it comes to your wellbeing, your DNA is one part of the story that also includes your environment and lifestyle.

Find out how your DNA relates to your caffeine consumption, lactose digestion and your muscle type.

Reports include See sample report

Carrier Status reports*

40+ reports

Being a "carrier" means you "carry" one genetic variant for a condition. Carriers do not typically have the genetic condition, but they can pass a genetic variant down to their children. If both parents are carriers, there is a 25% chance their child will have the condition.

Understanding your carrier status helps you work with your doctor to prepare for the health of your future family.

Reports include* See sample report

Traits reports

25+ reports

Find out your likelihood of having certain characteristics. See how your DNA affects your hair color, taste preferences and more. You can also compare your results to other 23andMe customers.

Reports include
  • Hair: Color, Curliness, Male Bald Spot
  • Taste & Smell: Sweet vs. Salty, Bitter
  • Facial Features: Cheek Dimples, Unibrow, Freckles
  • See all traits
See sample report

Hi. Still have questions about service?

Here are just a few of the things people frequently ask about 23andMe.
If you don't see your question here, get in touch with us.

The 23andMe DNA database has more than five million genotyped customers worldwide. You will continue to find new relatives as our database grows over time.

Yes. Our service has tools that enable you to share your reports with friends and family. In fact, the more family members that participate in 23andMe, the more interactive and engaging your results will be. When you share with family members who are 23andMe customers, you can see how genes are passed down in your family – and see the similarities and differences between family members – which can help you understand and connect to one another. Sharing and comparing information can be a great starting point for discussing and learning more about your identities, health conditions, ancestry and more.

Genetic information is hereditary and tells you many things about your close relatives as well as yourself. You should consider whether your family wants to know all of the information available, so be thoughtful about sharing it.

Your results may be useful to share with your doctor.

Genetic counselors can answer your questions about health-related DNA testing. These are health professionals that have special training in genetic conditions. They can help you decide whether genetic testing is right for you, and they can also help you better understand your 23andMe results.

23andMe offers two Personal Genetic Services: Health + Ancestry and Ancestry. Both services require submitting a saliva sample using our saliva collection kit that you send to the lab for analysis.

Our Health + Ancestry Service provides insights on your genetic health risks*, carrier status*, traits, wellness and ancestry. We analyse, compile and distill the information extracted from your DNA into 90+ reports you can access online and share with family and friends. See full list of reports offered.

Our Ancestry Service helps you understand who you are, where your DNA comes from and your family story. We analyse, compile and distill your DNA information into reports on your Ancestry Composition, Maternal & Paternal Haplogroups, Neanderthal Ancestry, Your DNA Family and provide a DNA Relatives tool to enable you to connect with relatives who share similar DNA.

*The 23andMe PGS test uses qualitative genotyping to detect select clinically relevant variants in the genomic DNA of adults from saliva for the purpose of reporting and interpreting genetic health risks and reporting carrier status. It is not intended to diagnose any disease. Your ethnicity may affect the relevance of each report and how your genetic health risk results are interpreted. Each genetic health risk report describes if a person has variants associated with a higher risk of developing a disease, but does not describe a person’s overall risk of developing the disease. The test is not intended to tell you anything about your current state of health, or to be used to make medical decisions, including whether or not you should take a medication, how much of a medication you should take, or determine any treatment. Our carrier status reports can be used to determine carrier status, but cannot determine if you have two copies of any genetic variant. These carrier reports are not intended to tell you anything about your risk for developing a disease in the future, the health of your fetus, or your newborn child's risk of developing a particular disease later in life. For certain conditions, we provide a single report that includes information on both carrier status and genetic health risk. Warnings & Limitations: The 23andMe PGS Genetic Health Risk Report for BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants) is indicated for reporting of the 185delAG and 5382insC variants in the BRCA1 gene and the 6174delT variant in the BRCA2 gene. The report describes if a woman is at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, and if a man is at increased risk of developing breast cancer or may be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The three variants included in this report are most common in people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and do not represent the majority of BRCA1/BRCA2 variants in the general population. This report does not include variants in other genes linked to hereditary cancers and the absence of variants included in this report does not rule out the presence of other genetic variants that may impact cancer risk. The PGS test is not a substitute for visits to a healthcare professional for recommended screenings or appropriate follow-up. Results should be confirmed in a clinical setting before taking any medical action. For important information and limitations regarding each genetic health risk and carrier status report, visit 23andme.com/test-info/

CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST REPORT

Genetic Weight

NOW WITH 150+ REGIONS

Health + Ancestry Service Original Price: €169 Sale Price: €118

NEW REPORT!

Genetic Health Risk reports*

Learn how your genetics can influence your risk for certain diseases.

5+ reports

Genetic Health Risk reports provide information about whether you carry genetic markers associated with risks for certain health conditions. They are not for diagnosis. Factors like lifestyle, environment and genetic markers not covered by this test can also play a role. These reports provide you with more insights to be the best possible advocate – for you.

Reports included*

  • BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants) lock
  • Celiac Disease
  • Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease lock
  • Parkinson's Disease lock
  • sample report
  • BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants)

    Learn more

    Genetic risk based on a limited
    set of variants for breast, ovarian
    and other cancers

    3 variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Genetic risk for a form of
    adult-onset vision loss

    2 variants in the ARMS2 and CFH genes; relevant for European descent

  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Genetic risk for lung and liver disease

    2 variants in the SERPINA1 gene; relevant for European descent

  • Celiac Disease

    Genetic risk for gluten-related
    autoimmune disorder

    2 variants near the HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DQA1 genes; relevant for European descent

  • G6PD Deficiency

    Genetic risk for a form of anemia

    1 variant in the G6PD gene; relevant for African descent

  • Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HFE‑Related)

    Genetic risk for iron overload

    2 variants in the HFE gene; relevant for European descent

  • Hereditary Thrombophilia

    Genetic risk for harmful blood clots

    2 variants in the F2 and F5 genes; relevant for European descent

  • Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    Genetic risk for a form of dementia

    1 variant in the APOE gene; variant found and studied in many ethnicities

  • Parkinson's Disease

    Genetic risk for a form
    of movement impairment

    2 variants in the LRRK2 and GBA genes; relevant for European, Ashkenazi Jewish, North African Berber descent

*The 23andMe PGS test uses qualitative genotyping to detect select clinically relevant variants in the genomic DNA of adults from saliva for the purpose of reporting and interpreting genetic health risks. It is not intended to diagnose any disease. Your ethnicity may affect the relevance of each report and how your genetic health risk results are interpreted. Each genetic health risk report describes if a person has variants associated with a higher risk of developing a disease, but does not describe a person’s overall risk of developing the disease. The test is not intended to tell you anything about your current state of health, or to be used to make medical decisions, including whether or not you should take a medication, how much of a medication you should take, or determine any treatment. Warnings & Limitations: The 23andMe PGS Genetic Health Risk Report for BRCA1/BRCA2 (Selected Variants) is indicated for reporting of the 185delAG and 5382insC variants in the BRCA1 gene and the 6174delT variant in the BRCA2 gene. The report describes if a woman is at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, and if a man is at increased risk of developing breast cancer or may be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The three variants included in this report are most common in people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and do not represent the majority of BRCA1/BRCA2 variants in the general population. This report does not include variants in other genes linked to hereditary cancers and the absence of variants included in this report does not rule out the presence of other genetic variants that may impact cancer risk. The PGS test is not a substitute for visits to a healthcare professional for recommended screenings or appropriate follow-up. Results should be confirmed in a clinical setting before taking any medical action. For important information and limitations regarding other genetic health risk reports, visit 23andme.com/test-info/genetic-health/

Now with 150+ regions

Ancestry

Discover where your DNA is from out of 150+ regions worldwide - and more.

5 reports

Your DNA comes from all of your ancestors. In your DNA we can find genetic traces of where your ancestors lived throughout history.

You also share DNA with people around the world today. You can choose to connect with them through our DNA Relative database. You can continue to find new relatives as our database of more than one million customers grows over time.

Ancestry Composition report

Find out where your DNA comes from around the world. Your DNA can tell you where your ancestors lived more than 500 years ago. See a percentage breakdown by region, including eastern Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe and more. We look at 150+ regions worldwide, and we will continue to refine your results as our database grows.

Discover when different ancestries were introduced into your DNA. Learn how many generations ago you had an ancestor that was descended from a single population or ethnicity.

Your DNA Family report

Receive an overview of the diverse group of people who share your DNA. Get to know your DNA Family with this unique (and anonymous) report and view the places your DNA Relatives call home. You can even learn more about the ancestry and traits of your DNA Relatives.

DNA Relative Finder tool

Find other 23andMe customers who share your DNA and ancestors. Explore matches that range from close family to distant relatives, and make new connections. Shed light on your family story by discovering an unknown relative — nearby or elsewhere around the world. You can always choose to opt in or out of this tool.

Maternal & Paternal Haplogroups

Discover the origins of your maternal (your mother's mother's mother's…) and paternal (your father's father's father's…) ancestors and how they moved around the world over thousands of years.

We report on your maternal and paternal lineage by identifying your haplogroups. A haplogroup can trace part of your ancestry back to a specific group of individuals in the distant past.

Women can only trace their maternal haplogroup. This is because the paternal haplogroup is traced through the Y chromosome, which women do not inherit.

Neanderthal Ancestry report

Neanderthals were ancient humans who interbred with modern humans before becoming extinct 40,000 years ago. Find out how much of your DNA came from Neanderthals. Compare your results with family and friends.

Wellness reports

Learn how your genes play a role in your well-being and lifestyle choices.

5+ reports

When it comes to your wellbeing, your DNA is one part of the story that also includes your environment and lifestyle choices.

Find out how your DNA relates to your caffeine consumption, lactose digestion and muscle type.

Reports included

  • Alcohol Flush Reaction
  • Caffeine Consumption
  • Deep Sleep
  • Genetic Weight
  • Lactose Intolerance
  • Muscle Composition
  • Saturated Fat and Weight
  • Sleep Movement

Carrier Status reports*

If you are starting a family, find out if you are a carrier for an inherited condition that could affect your children.

40+ reports

Being a "carrier" means you "carry" one genetic variant for a condition. Genetic variants are changes in your DNA. Carriers do not typically have the genetic condition, but they can pass a genetic variant down to their children. If both parents are carriers, there is a 25% chance their child will have the condition.

Understanding your carrier status helps you work with your doctor to prepare for the health of your future family. You may also choose to share your carrier status with other family members who may benefit from this information.

Reports included*

  • ARSACS

    1 variant in the SACS gene; relevant for French Canadian descent

  • Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum with Peripheral Neuropathy

    1 variant in the SLC12A6 gene; relevant for French Canadian descent

  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    3 variants in the PKHD1 gene

  • Beta Thalassemia and Related Hemoglobinopathies

    10 variants in the HBB gene; relevant for Sardinian, Cypriot, Italian/Sicilian, Greek descent

  • Bloom Syndrome

    1 variant in the BLM gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Canavan Disease

    3 variants in the ASPA gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Type 1a (PMM2-CDG)

    2 variants in the PMM2 gene; relevant for Danish descent

  • Cystic Fibrosis

    29 variants in the CFTR gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish, European, Hispanic/Latino descent

  • D-Bifunctional Protein Deficiency

    2 variants in the HSD17B4 gene

  • Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    1 variant in the DLD gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Familial Dysautonomia

    1 variant in the IKBKAP gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Familial Hyperinsulinism (ABCC8-Related)

    3 variants in the ABCC8 gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Fanconi Anemia Group C

    3 variants in the FANCC gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • GRACILE Syndrome

    1 variant in the BCS1L gene; relevant for Finnish descent

  • Gaucher Disease Type 1

    3 variants in the GBA gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    1 variant in the G6PC gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ib

    2 variants in the SLC37A4 gene

  • Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    4 variants in the ALDOB gene; relevant for European descent

  • Herlitz Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa (LAMB3-Related)

    3 variants in the LAMB3 gene

  • Leigh Syndrome, French Canadian Type

    1 variant in the LRPPRC gene; relevant for French Canadian descent

  • Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2D

    1 variant in the SGCA gene

  • Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2E

    1 variant in the SGCB gene; relevant for Amish descent

  • Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I

    1 variant in the FKRP gene

  • MCAD Deficiency

    4 variants in the ACADM gene; relevant for European descent

  • Maple Syrup Urine Disease Type 1B

    2 variants in the BCKDHB gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Mucolipidosis Type IV

    1 variant in the MCOLN1 gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN5-Related)

    1 variant in the CLN5 gene; relevant for Finnish descent

  • Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (PPT1-Related)

    3 variants in the PPT1 gene; relevant for Finnish descent

  • Niemann-Pick Disease Type A

    3 variants in the SMPD1 gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome

    1 variant in the NBN gene

  • Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss and Deafness, DFNB1 (GJB2-Related)

    2 variants in the GJB2 gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish, European descent

  • Pendred Syndrome and DFNB4 Hearing Loss (SLC26A4-Related)

    6 variants in the SLC26A4 gene

  • Phenylketonuria and Related Disorders

    23 variants in the PAH gene; relevant for Irish, Northern European descent

  • Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 2

    1 variant in the GRHPR gene

  • Rhizomelic Chondrodysplasia Punctata Type 1

    1 variant in the PEX7 gene

  • Salla Disease

    1 variant in the SLC17A5 gene; relevant for Finnish, Swedish descent

  • Sickle Cell Anemia

    1 variant in the HBB gene; relevant for African American, African descent

  • Sjögren-Larsson Syndrome

    1 variant in the ALDH3A2 gene; relevant for Swedish descent

  • Tay-Sachs Disease

    4 variants in the HEXA gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish, Cajun descent

  • Tyrosinemia Type I

    4 variants in the FAH gene; relevant for French Canadian, Finnish descent

  • Usher Syndrome Type 1F

    1 variant in the PCDH15 gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Usher Syndrome Type 3A

    1 variant in the CLRN1 gene; relevant for Ashkenazi Jewish descent

  • Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum (PEX1-Related)

    1 variant in the PEX1 gene

*The 23andMe PGS test uses qualitative genotyping to detect select clinically relevant variants in the genomic DNA of adults for the purpose of reporting carrier status and reporting and interpreting genetic health risks. The relevance of each report may vary based on ethnicity. Our carrier status reports can be used to determine carrier status, but cannot determine if you have two copies of any genetic variant. These carrier reports are not intended to tell you anything about your risk for developing a disease in the future or anything about the health of your fetus, or your newborn child's risk of developing a particular disease later in life. For certain conditions, we provide a single report that includes information on both carrier status and genetic health risk. The Cystic Fibrosis carrier status report is indicated for the detection of 28 variants in the CFTR gene and is most relevant for people of Ashkenazi Jewish, European, and Hispanic/Latino descent. The Sickle Cell Anemia carrier status report is indicated for the detection of the HbS variant in the HBB gene and is most relevant for people of African descent. The carrier status reports related to hereditary hearing loss consist of two tests – one indicated for the detection of two variants in the GJB2 gene which is most relevant for people of Ashkenazi Jewish and European descent, and one indicated for the detection of six variants in the SLC26A4 gene.

Traits reports

Learn how your DNA influences your facial features, taste, smell and other traits.

25+ reports

Find out your likelihood of having certain characteristics. See how your DNA affects your hair color, taste preferences and more. You can also compare your results with other 23andMe customers.

Reports included

  • Hair: Color, Curliness, Male Bald Spot
  • Taste & Smell: Sweet vs. Salty, Bitter
  • Facial Features: Cheek Dimples, Unibrow
  • sample report
  • Ability to Match Musical Pitch
  • Asparagus Odor Detection
  • Back Hair (available for men only)
  • Bald Spot (available for men only)
  • Bitter Taste
  • Cheek Dimples
  • Cilantro (Coriander) Taste Aversion
  • Cleft Chin
  • Earlobe Type
  • Early Hair Loss (available for men only)
  • Earwax Type
  • Eye Color
  • Fear of Heights
  • Finger Length Ratio
  • Freckles
  • Hair Photobleaching (hair lightening from the sun)
  • Hair Texture
  • Hair Thickness
  • Light or Dark Hair
  • Misophonia (hatred of the sound of chewing)
  • Mosquito Bite Frequency
  • Newborn Hair
  • Photic Sneeze Reflex
  • Red Hair
  • Skin Pigmentation
  • Sweet vs. Salty
  • Toe Length Ratio
  • Unibrow
  • Wake-Up Time
  • Widow's Peak

What you can do

Use interactive tools to share, compare and discover more with friends and family.

Share and Compare

Share and compare your health, traits and ancestry reports with friends and family. You can even explore the genetic similarities and differences between you and a family member in a side-by-side comparison. Requires relatives to be genotyped.

Inheritance Tracing

See how different traits and ancestries have traveled through generations of your family. Requires relatives to be genotyped.

DNA Relatives

Find people who share your DNA and ancestors. Explore matches that range from close family to distant relatives, and make new connections. Shed light on your family story by discovering an unknown relative — nearby or elsewhere around the world. You can always choose to opt in or out of this tool.

Raw data included  

Raw data is for information purposes only; must not be used for medical or diagnostic purposes.

add to cart add to cart Original Price: €169 Sale Price: €118