Let's talk about Type 2 Diabetes & Genetics

What is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition where blood sugar is too high. It can develop when your body is unable to make enough insulin and/or respond properly to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that normally helps our bodies use or store glucose from food. Having type 2 diabetes increases your risk for life-threatening complications, such as heart disease and other organ damage.


Is type 2 diabetes genetic?

Genetics does play a role in type 2 diabetes. This means some people will be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes based on their genetics. However, genetics alone is not enough to cause the disease. Other factors, including lifestyle choices, influence the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes as well.

Healthy lifestyle choices matter.

Healthy living can lower the chances of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s possible to delay or even prevent the disease by being active, eating healthy foods and maintaining a healthy weight.

9 out of 10 people with prediabetes don't know they have it

Many are not aware they have prediabetes.

Across the general U.S. population, around 40% of people are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime.More than 1 out of 3 adults currently have prediabetes, but 9 out of 10 people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. In prediabetes, blood sugar levels are elevated but are not yet high enough to be considered diabetes. When prediabetes is detected early, diabetes prevention may be possible.Talk to a healthcare professional to learn more about prediabetes, as well as diabetes testing and prevention.

What do your genes say about type 2 diabetes?

23andMe can tell you if your genetics are associated with a higher than typical likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. The 23andMe Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report estimates your chances of developing type 2 diabetes by looking at more than 1,000 places in your DNA. The report also equips you with information and tools to help you take action. You can get the Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report and more with 23andMe’s Health + Ancestry Service.

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Please note:

  • The 23andMe Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report does not diagnose type 2 diabetes or prediabetes and should not be used to make medical decisions.
  • The report was developed by 23andMe scientists using data and insights gathered from thousands of customers who participate in our research. Reports based on 23andMe research provide an estimate of your likelihood of developing a condition based on your genetics and other factors. This report does not account for lifestyle or family history.
  • The report does not account for every possible genetic variant that could affect your likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.

References

American Diabetes Association. (2018). “2. Classification and Diagnosis of Diabetes: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2018.” Diabetes Care. 41(Suppl 1):S13-S27.

American Diabetes Association. (2018). “5. Prevention or Delay of Type 2 Diabetes: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2018.” Diabetes Care. 41(Suppl 1):S51-S54.

American Diabetes Association. (2018). “9. Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Management: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2018.” Diabetes Care. 41(Suppl 1):S86-S104.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017, July 18). “New CDC report: More than 100 million Americans have diabetes or prediabetes.” Retrieved September 17, 2018 from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p0718-diabetes-report.html.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017, November 7). “Prediabetes: Could It Be You?” Retrieved September 17, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/library/socialmedia/infographics.html.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, August 15). “Type 2 Diabetes”. Retrieved September 17, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/type2.html.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, January 12). “The Surprising Truth About Prediabetes”. Retrieved September 17, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/features/diabetesprevention/index.html.

Fowler MJ. (2008). “Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications of Diabetes.” Clinical Diabetes. 26(2): 77-82

Gregg EW et al. (2014). “Trends in lifetime risk and years of life lost due to diabetes in the USA, 1985-2011: a modelling study.” Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2(11):867-74.

Huxley R et al. (2006). “Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women: meta-analysis of 37 prospective cohort studies.” BMJ. 332(7533):73-8.

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2017, July 18). “National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017.” Retrieved September 17, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pdfs/data/statistics/national-diabetes-statistics-report.pdf.

Stumvoll M et al. (2005). “Type 2 diabetes: principles of pathogenesis and therapy.” Lancet. 365(9467):1333-46.